Brand new consumer research from the National Confectioners Association from September found that 80% of people believe that they will find creative and safe ways to celebrate the Halloween season this year. This is up from just 63% two months earlier in July. Joining this growing wave of approval and support are public health experts, community leaders, newspaper editorial boards and columnists who say that we can prioritize safety and still have a little fun this fall with Halloween celebrations that last all October long.

Mike Braun, U.S. Senator from Indiana, and Matt Gentry, Mayor of Lebanon, Ind.
The Reporter

October 27, 2020

“While politics might continue to divide the country as we approach the election, there’s something that Republicans, Democrats and Independents can all agree on: Halloween can still be celebrated safely, and chocolate and candy’s uncanny ability to boost our mood and lighten our perspective is needed now more than ever.”

Dr. Stephen Ostroff, former CDC and FDA Official
Public Health Experts Agree: Halloween Is Happening

October 26, 2020

“Halloween is traditionally an outdoor holiday and the one time of the year when kids want to wear a mask. This is fully consistent with the CDC safety guidelines, and with the appropriate physical distancing, there are ways to do trick-or-treating safely. Whether this means employing a creative ‘one-way’ solution or finding another way to show off costumes, this type of activity can easily take place this week with minimal risk of COVID-19 transmission.”

“Halloween is traditionally an outdoor holiday and the one time of the year when kids want to wear a mask. This is fully consistent with the CDC safety guidelines, and with the appropriate physical distancing, there are ways to do trick-or-treating safely. Whether this means employing a creative ‘one-way’ solution or finding another way to show off costumes, this type of activity can easily take place this week with minimal risk of COVID-19 transmission.”

Dr. Stephen Ostroff, former CDC and FDA Official
Public Health Experts Agree: Halloween Is Happening

October 26, 2020

Bill de Blasio, mayor of New York City
New York Post
October 21, 2020

“Halloween is happening in New York City and it’s going to be safe!”

Bill de Blasio

Dr. Gavin Yamey, professor of global health and public policy at Duke University, and Melissa Kay, research scholar at the Duke Global Digital Health Science Center
USA TODAY

October 19, 2020

“We’ve looked at the risks … and believe that in most cases, there are ways to honor the tradition. What does a safer celebration look like? It begins with the fundamental precautions we should be taking with any activity during this pandemic, including wearing face masks, maintaining social distance and regularly washing hands. We can still enjoy a modified form of trick-or-treating, even in the midst of this pandemic.”

“We’ve looked at the risks … and believe that in most cases, there are ways to honor the tradition. What does a safer celebration look like? It begins with the fundamental precautions we should be taking with any activity during this pandemic, including wearing face masks, maintaining social distance and regularly washing hands. We can still enjoy a modified form of trick-or-treating, even in the midst of this pandemic.”

Dr. Gavin Yamey, professor of global health and public policy at Duke University, and Melissa Kay, research scholar at the Duke Global Digital Health Science Center
USA TODAY

October 19, 2020

Aaron E. Carroll, professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine and a contributing opinion writer
The New York Times

October 15, 2020

“But if I had to design an activity for children that might be safe during a pandemic, I’m not sure that I could do a better job than trick-or-treating. It’s outside. It can be socially distanced. The food is individually wrapped (before anyone partakes, parents can wipe the candies down while kids wash their hands). It’s the one night a year when kids will not argue at all about wearing masks.”

Whoopi Goldberg, actor, comedian and television host
ABC’s “The View”

October 5, 2020

Whoopi Goldberg

“Let’s talk about something a little lighter because I’m going to make a case. Halloween is a few weeks away – CDC says there’s a safe way to celebrate, recommending that trick-or-treating be limited to individually wrapped goodie bags. Well, clearly as parents, we know that. I think it’s a great idea! People keep talking about canceling Halloween. Don’t do that to the kids because they may not have Thanksgiving with the family – this is one of the few times they can actually go outside with a different kind of mask on, and you as the adult can help them navigate. I feel safe going with Charli [Golderg’s 6-yr old great-granddaughter] to trick-or-treat.”

Whoopi Goldberg

“Halloween is a few weeks away – CDC says there’s a safe way to celebrate, recommending that trick-or-treating be limited to individually wrapped goodie bags. Well, clearly as parents, we know that. I think it’s a great idea! People keep talking about canceling Halloween. Don’t do that to the kids because they may not have Thanksgiving with the family – this is one of the few times they can actually go outside with a different kind of mask on, and you as the adult can help them navigate. I feel safe going with Charli [Golderg’s 6-yr old great-granddaughter] to trick-or-treat.”

Whoopi Goldberg, actor, comedian and television host
ABC’s “The View”

October 5, 2020

Hear more from:

Public Health Experts

Dr. Darria Long Gillespie, emergency medicine physician and clinical assistant professor at the University of Tennessee
Newsweek

October 27, 2020

“It’s not the Halloween 2020 that we envisioned, but by thinking in terms of smart risk mitigation, we can balance safety and play (for all ages). Ensuring that we do that—and focusing on what we can do—is the antidote that we all need right now.” 

Dr. Stephen Ostroff, former CDC and FDA Official
Public Health Experts Agree: Halloween Is Happening

October 26, 2020

“Halloween is traditionally an outdoor holiday and the one time of the year when kids want to wear a mask. This is fully consistent with the CDC safety guidelines, and with the appropriate physical distancing, there are ways to do trick-or-treating safely. Whether this means employing a creative ‘one-way’ solution or finding another way to show off costumes, this type of activity can easily take place this week with minimal risk of COVID-19 transmission.”

“Halloween is traditionally an outdoor holiday and the one time of the year when kids want to wear a mask. This is fully consistent with the CDC safety guidelines, and with the appropriate physical distancing, there are ways to do trick-or-treating safely. Whether this means employing a creative ‘one-way’ solution or finding another way to show off costumes, this type of activity can easily take place this week with minimal risk of COVID-19 transmission.”

Dr. Stephen Ostroff, former CDC and FDA Official
Public Health Experts Agree: Halloween Is Happening

October 26, 2020

Dr. Gavin Yamey, professor of global health and public policy at Duke University, and Melissa Kay, research scholar at the Duke Global Digital Health Science Center
USA TODAY

October 19, 2020

“We’ve looked at the risks … and believe that in most cases, there are ways to honor the tradition. What does a safer celebration look like? It begins with the fundamental precautions we should be taking with any activity during this pandemic, including wearing face masks, maintaining social distance and regularly washing hands. We can still enjoy a modified form of trick-or-treating, even in the midst of this pandemic.”

Aaron E. Carroll, professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine and a contributing opinion writer
The New York Times

October 15, 2020

“But if I had to design an activity for children that might be safe during a pandemic, I’m not sure that I could do a better job than trick-or-treating. It’s outside. It can be socially distanced. The food is individually wrapped (before anyone partakes, parents can wipe the candies down while kids wash their hands). It’s the one night a year when kids will not argue at all about wearing masks.”

“But if I had to design an activity for children that might be safe during a pandemic, I’m not sure that I could do a better job than trick-or-treating. It’s outside. It can be socially distanced. The food is individually wrapped (before anyone partakes, parents can wipe the candies down while kids wash their hands). It’s the one night a year when kids will not argue at all about wearing masks.”

Aaron E. Carroll, professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine and a contributing opinion writer
The New York Times

October 15, 2020

Dr. Jaime Friedman, pediatrician with a practice in San Diego and director of marketing at Children’s Primary Care Medical Group
Huffington Post

October 8, 2020

“Overall, while this Halloween will be very different, with some creativity and positivity, parents can still make it fun.”

Dr. David L. Hill, a pediatrician in practice in Wayne County, North Carolina
Huffington Post

October 8, 2020

“Much of the way we have traditionally celebrated Halloween might accommodate reasonable COVID-19 precautions.”

“Much of the way we have traditionally celebrated Halloween might accommodate reasonable COVID-19 precautions.”

Dr. David L. Hill, a pediatrician in practice in Wayne County, North Carolina
Huffington Post

October 8, 2020

Dr. Nerissa Bauer, a behavioral pediatrician in Indianapolis
Huffington Post

October 8, 2020

“I think it is important for kids to have fun ways to celebrate this holiday but still stay safe.”

Dr. Jacqueline Winkelmann, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital of Orange County
Huffington Post

October 8, 2020

“Keeping a sense of normalcy around holidays will bring a level of joy and excitement that kids haven’t had in a long time and need now more than ever.”

“Keeping a sense of normalcy around holidays will bring a level of joy and excitement that kids haven’t had in a long time and need now more than ever.”

Dr. Jacqueline Winkelmann, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital of Orange County
Huffington Post

October 8, 2020

Dr. Jean Moorjani, a pediatrician at Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children
Huffington Post

October 8, 2020

“[I]f homeowners do plan to participate in handing out candy, they have a unique opportunity to get creative with how to do so safely and keeping physical distance. I’ve heard of people creating ‘candy chutes’ where they slide treats to trick-or-treaters in a contactless but fun way. It’s very important that if you’re going to pass out candy, that it is individually wrapped.”

Dr. Robert Glatter, emergency physician at New York City’s Lenox Hill Hospital
New York Times

October 4, 2020

“Holidays help us maintain our sense of rituals and ‘normalcy’ during a not-so normal time. Whatever we can do to keep holiday celebrations and traditions at least partially intact — while remaining safe — serves as a guidepost or compass during these turbulent times.”

“Holidays help us maintain our sense of rituals and ‘normalcy’ during a not-so normal time. Whatever we can do to keep holiday celebrations and traditions at least partially intact — while remaining safe — serves as a guidepost or compass during these turbulent times.”

Dr. Robert Glatter, emergency physician at New York City’s Lenox Hill Hospital
New York Times

October 4, 2020

Dr. Tista Ghosh, epidemiologist and senior medical director at Grand Rounds in San Francisco
New York Times

October 4, 2020

I think completely taking away Halloween could be detrimental to some of the mental health issues that kids are facing right now. [Instead] balance the risk of whatever activity they’re doing with mental health risks as well, and look for ways to minimize risk.

Malia Jones, Ph.D., MPH
Associate Scientist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison – Applied Population Laboratory
Slate

September 29, 2020

“Lucky for us, most Halloween traditions in the U.S. are highly compatible with those COVID-19 harm reduction basics. All you have to do is take the party outdoors, put on your mask, and cut the invitation list down to just a few people.”

“Lucky for us, most Halloween traditions in the U.S. are highly compatible with those COVID-19 harm reduction basics. All you have to do is take the party outdoors, put on your mask, and cut the invitation list down to just a few people.”

Malia Jones, Ph.D., MPH
Associate Scientist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison – Applied Population Laboratory
Slate

September 29, 2020

Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, a professor of pediatric infectious diseases and health research and policy at Stanford Health Care
TODAY

September 14, 2020

“They might be able to do distanced events or go outdoors with two or three friends who stay apart,” she said, noting that the outdoor nature of trick-or-treating would make it safer than an indoor event. “It’s going to be tough, but there are creative ways to do it as long as you can stay within those parameters of distancing and masking hygiene.”

Dr. Edith Bracho-Sanchez, assistant professor of pediatrics and director of the pediatric telemedicine program with Columbia University Medical Center
Good Morning America

September 11, 2020

“I don’t want to say that trick-or-treating should be completely canceled. It’s something that communities are going to have to weigh community by community, and that families are going to have to weigh family by family.”

“I don’t want to say that trick-or-treating should be completely canceled. It’s something that communities are going to have to weigh community by community, and that families are going to have to weigh family by family.”

Dr. Edith Bracho-Sanchez, assistant professor of pediatrics and director of the pediatric telemedicine program with Columbia University Medical Center
Good Morning America

September 11, 2020

Dr. Stephen Ostroff, former FDA deputy commissioner; chief scientist and former deputy director of the National Center for Infectious Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Five Considerations for State & City Health Departments Seeking to Create a Safe & Fun Halloween

September 10, 2020

“At a time when nothing seems to be normal because of COVID-19, parents desperately want something to be fun and relatively normal for their kids. Surveys have shown that most parents want their kids to celebrate Halloween. Therefore, the more appropriate question is not whether to celebrate Halloween, but how can we make it as safe as possible for everyone?” 

Dr. Neha Vyas, family medicine specialist at The Cleveland Clinic
September 7, 2020

“Get creative and encourage your child to think about how their face mask can be part of their costume. Opt for a mask that matches the costume’s style, or have them pick a costume where a face mask is an essential part – like a doctor or a ninja. And as long as your child can still see and breathe fine and there’s plenty of ventilation, you can layer a Halloween mask over a cloth face mask.”

“Get creative and encourage your child to think about how their face mask can be part of their costume. Opt for a mask that matches the costume’s style, or have them pick a costume where a face mask is an essential part – like a doctor or a ninja. And as long as your child can still see and breathe fine and there’s plenty of ventilation, you can layer a Halloween mask over a cloth face mask.”

Dr. Neha Vyas, family medicine specialist at The Cleveland Clinic
September 7, 2020

Dr. Dana Hawkinson, medical director of infection prevention and control for the University of Kansas Health System
The Kansas City Star

September 7, 2020

“Since it happens outdoors — and if household members stick together, travel in as small a group as possible and distance themselves from others — it should be ‘very reasonable to do trick-or-treating’ this year.”

Dr. Mark Loafman, chair of family and community medicine at Cook County Health
NBC Chicago

September 3, 2020

“So that’s sort of a backdrop so I think from a public health point of view where we always want to help families address opportunities to find other ways to celebrate it and, you know, the risks associated with that.”

“So that’s sort of a backdrop so I think from a public health point of view where we always want to help families address opportunities to find other ways to celebrate it and, you know, the risks associated with that.”

Dr. Mark Loafman, chair of family and community medicine at Cook County Health
NBC Chicago

September 3, 2020

Dr. Gary Reschak, pediatrician at Northwestern Medicine Huntley Hospital
The Daily Meal

August 19, 2020

“If everyone stays outside, wears a mask and uses good hand hygiene, Halloween can be a safe and manageable celebration.”

Dr. Amyna Husain,
Physician in pediatric emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins specializing in disaster preparedness for pediatrics
The Daily Meal

August 19, 2020

 “I can’t say that trick-or-treating is lost this year. I think there are ways to do it safely.”

 “I can’t say that trick-or-treating is lost this year. I think there are ways to do it safely.”

Dr. Amyna Husain,
Physician in pediatric emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins specializing in disaster preparedness for pediatrics
The Daily Meal

August 19, 2020

Government Officials

Mike Braun, U.S. Senator from Indiana, and Matt Gentry, Mayor of Lebanon, Ind.
The Reporter

October 27, 2020

“While politics might continue to divide the country as we approach the election, there’s something that Republicans, Democrats and Independents can all agree on: Halloween can still be celebrated safely, and chocolate and candy’s uncanny ability to boost our mood and lighten our perspective is needed now more than ever.”

Bill de Blasio, mayor of New York City
New York Post
October 21, 2020

“Halloween is happening in New York City and it’s going to be safe!”

Bill de Blasio

“Halloween is happening in New York City and it’s going to be safe!”

Bill de Blasio, mayor of New York City
New York Post
October 21, 2020

Kaye Kelly, co-chair of the Franklin Cultural Council, Franklin, Massachusetts
Boston Globe

October 14, 2020

“Halloween gives us a chance to come up with a positive way for families and kids to have fun, but also to engage the whole community and add some levity to a really uncertain time.”

Thomas Farley, M.D., M.P.H., health commissioner, City of Philadelphia Department of Public Health
Press Conference
October 7, 2020

“We received many questions about Halloween. We’re not attempting to cancel this event. I’m not really sure that it would be possible to cancel such an organic event as that.”

“We received many questions about Halloween. We’re not attempting to cancel this event. I’m not really sure that it would be possible to cancel such an organic event as that.”

Thomas Farley, M.D., M.P.H., health commissioner, City of Philadelphia Department of Public Health
Press Conference
October 7, 2020

Wilma J. Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., public health officer
County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency
October 5, 2020

“While Halloween activities must change, we still want people to be able to dress up and have fun for the holiday.”

“Halloween is ON!”

Phil Murphy, governor of New Jersey
Twitter

October 5, 2020

Ned Lamont, Governor of Connecticut
Wall Street Journal

October 3, 2020

“I anticipate we are going to have a Halloween season. It’s a time of year when people automatically wear masks, they often wear gloves. So it seems like you are 90% of the way towards a safe way to do Halloween, just by definition.”

Lori Lightfoot, Mayor of Chicago, AKA Rona Destroyer
Chicago Tribune

October 1, 2020

This year more than ever it is important to celebrate Halloween safely and responsibly. We are making sure that children and adults that want to enjoy Halloween can do so without putting themselves or their community at risk.

This year more than ever it is important to celebrate Halloween safely and responsibly. We are making sure that children and adults that want to enjoy Halloween can do so without putting themselves or their community at risk.

Lori Lightfoot, Mayor of Chicago, AKA Rona Destroyer
Chicago Tribune

October 1, 2020

Gina M. Raimondo, Governor of Rhode Island
Boston Globe

September 30, 2020

There will be Halloween in Rhode Island.

Dr. Kris Box, Indiana Health Commissioner
Indianapolis Star

September 30, 2020

Get creative and have a fun and safe Halloween.

Get creative and have a fun and safe Halloween.

Dr. Kris Box, Indiana Health Commissioner
Indianapolis Star

September 30, 2020

Asa Hutchinson, Governor of Arkansas
THV 11 CBS

September 22, 2020

“If you follow our guidelines then it’ll ought to be a safe Halloween.”

Andrew Cuomo, Governor of New York
The New York Post

September 15, 2020

“I would not ban trick-or-treaters going door to door. I don’t think that’s appropriate. You have neighbors – if you want to go knock on your neighbor’s door, God bless you. I’m not going to tell you not to. If you want to go for a walk with your child through the neighborhood, I’m not going to tell you you can’t take your child through the neighborhood. I’m not going to do that. I’ll give you my advice and guidance and then you’ll make the decision about what you do that night.”

“I would not ban trick-or-treaters going door to door. I don’t think that’s appropriate. You have neighbors – if you want to go knock on your neighbor’s door, God bless you. I’m not going to tell you not to. If you want to go for a walk with your child through the neighborhood, I’m not going to tell you you can’t take your child through the neighborhood. I’m not going to do that. I’ll give you my advice and guidance and then you’ll make the decision about what you do that night.”

Andrew Cuomo, Governor of New York
The New York Post

September 15, 2020

Ryan Alsop,
chief administrative officer, Kern County
ABC News Bakersfield

September 10, 2020

“Announcing that you’re canceling Halloween is a fairly bold statement to make; I don’t know how you do that.”

Stephan Wilder, mayor of North Canton
WKYC

September 10, 2020

“For such a traditional experience of Halloween, I have all the confidence that our community will watch out for each other and maintain that families and children can have a safe activity.”

“For such a traditional experience of Halloween, I have all the confidence that our community will watch out for each other and maintain that families and children can have a safe activity.”

Stephan Wilder, mayor of North Canton
WKYC

September 10, 2020

David Sweat, Shelby County Health Department chief of epidemiology
FOX 13 Memphis

September 10, 2020

“There are no plans at the moment to ‘cancel’ Halloween.”

Joseph Petty, mayor of Worcester
NBC Boston

September 10, 2020

“This is probably one of the biggest events besides Christmas in the country for both children and adults, and people love Halloween, they love having a good time, and I just don’t want to take that away from them.”

“This is probably one of the biggest events besides Christmas in the country for both children and adults, and people love Halloween, they love having a good time, and I just don’t want to take that away from them.”

Joseph Petty, mayor of Worcester
NBC Boston

September 10, 2020

Janice Hahn,
Los Angeles County supervisor
Twitter

September 9, 2020

“Even a pandemic can’t cancel Halloween— in fact, it’s the only day of the year we were expected to wear masks before this crisis started. Be safe, practice physical distancing, and get creative about how you celebrate with your kids this year.”

The City of Hillard
September 3, 2020

“Almost 90 percent of respondents said they think trick-or-treating can safely happen – especially with some basic precautions.”

“Almost 90 percent of respondents said they think trick-or-treating can safely happen – especially with some basic precautions.”

The City of Hillard
September 3, 2020

Media

Bonnie Kristian, contributing editor
The Week

October 21, 2020

“We are staring down a long winter, and we need to seize every opportunity to combine normalcy and responsibility. Halloween is one such opportunity, and irrationally rejecting it without scientific basis is an unforced error.

I don’t want to go trick-or-treating, but a lot of people do. Let them mask up and take a neighborly walk.”

Whoopi Goldberg, actor, comedian and television host
ABC’s “The View”

October 5, 2020

Whoopi Goldberg

“Let’s talk about something a little lighter because I’m going to make a case. Halloween is a few weeks away – CDC says there’s a safe way to celebrate, recommending that trick-or-treating be limited to individually wrapped goodie bags. Well, clearly as parents, we know that. I think it’s a great idea! People keep talking about canceling Halloween. Don’t do that to the kids because they may not have Thanksgiving with the family – this is one of the few times they can actually go outside with a different kind of mask on, and you as the adult can help them navigate. I feel safe going with Charli [Golderg’s 6-yr old great-granddaughter] to trick-or-treat.”

Whoopi Goldberg

“Halloween is a few weeks away – CDC says there’s a safe way to celebrate, recommending that trick-or-treating be limited to individually wrapped goodie bags. Well, clearly as parents, we know that. I think it’s a great idea! People keep talking about canceling Halloween. Don’t do that to the kids because they may not have Thanksgiving with the family – this is one of the few times they can actually go outside with a different kind of mask on, and you as the adult can help them navigate. I feel safe going with Charli [Golderg’s 6-yr old great-granddaughter] to trick-or-treat.”

Whoopi Goldberg, actor, comedian and television host
ABC’s “The View”

October 5, 2020

Tribune-Review (Western Pennsylvania) Editorial Board
September 30, 2020

“Halloween can be less a celebration of ghosts and goblins than it can be about creativity. People who can find a way to make a kid a Transformer costume out of cardboard boxes can probably figure out a way to not just hand out treats in a socially distant manner but to do so in an innovative and entertaining way.

And kids need this. Communities need this. We all need this.”

Jeneen Interlandi, The New York Times Editorial Board Member
The New York Times

September 18, 2020

“When it comes to the holidays, most Americans will be in the same boat. Halloween may be just fine: Some health departments have advised against it, but trick-or-treating is a largely outdoor event, many costumes come with masks of their own, and fomite transmission (where the virus is contracted by touching inanimate objects like plastic pumpkins) is much less of a concern than scientists originally thought. With the right precautions (maybe skip the haunted house), it should be safe to ring those doorbells.”

“When it comes to the holidays, most Americans will be in the same boat. Halloween may be just fine: Some health departments have advised against it, but trick-or-treating is a largely outdoor event, many costumes come with masks of their own, and fomite transmission (where the virus is contracted by touching inanimate objects like plastic pumpkins) is much less of a concern than scientists originally thought. With the right precautions (maybe skip the haunted house), it should be safe to ring those doorbells.”

Jeneen Interlandi, The New York Times Editorial Board Member
The New York Times

September 18, 2020

Bethany Mandel, Contributor
The Washington Examiner

September 10, 2020

“Our children have already had so much taken from them, and it is senseless from a scientific perspective to take trick-or-treating away from them, too.”

Amy Schwabe, columnist
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

September 10, 2020

“Coronavirus doesn’t have to cancel Halloween. People are brainstorming safe trick-or-treat alternatives.”

“Coronavirus doesn’t have to cancel Halloween. People are brainstorming safe trick-or-treat alternatives.”

Amy Schwabe, columnist
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

September 10, 2020

“If pizza can be delivered safely to your door, then kids can receive candy that you drop (or toss) into a sack on your porch or in the front yard… Halloween, we get the sense, is going to happen with or without the blessing of politicians. So how about one small nod to getting back to normalcy, starting with a pillowcase stuffed with chocolate, Mayor?”

Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University
The Washington Post

September 9, 2020

“Will Halloween 2020 have to be canceled? The answer, happily, is no — if we adopt the right precautions and the right attitude.”

“Will Halloween 2020 have to be canceled? The answer, happily, is no — if we adopt the right precautions and the right attitude.”

Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University
The Washington Post

September 9, 2020

Parents and Public Figures

Martha Stewart, American Business Woman and Halloween Expert
Chicago Tribune

October 1, 2020

“Halloween will undoubtedly be different this year, but there are still plenty of fun ways to celebrate.”

“Halloween will undoubtedly be different this year, but there are still plenty of fun ways to celebrate.”

Martha Stewart, American Business Woman and Halloween Expert
Chicago Tribune

October 1, 2020

Miranda Leon
The Associated Press

September 23, 2020

“So much has been taken from our kids this year — classes cut short, sports cancelled, summer camps cancelled,” she said. “I refuse to take away the joy of trick or treating from my kids.”

Vicki Ferretti
The New York Post

September 23, 2020

“It’s finally on a Saturday this year, and kids have suffered enough during the last few months. I think it’s smart if neighbors just leave out candy instead of opening the doors, but if not, my kids will have masks on and I don’t see how it’s any different than going and buying candy from a grocery store.”

“It’s finally on a Saturday this year, and kids have suffered enough during the last few months. I think it’s smart if neighbors just leave out candy instead of opening the doors, but if not, my kids will have masks on and I don’t see how it’s any different than going and buying candy from a grocery store.”

Vicki Ferretti
The New York Post

September 23, 2020

Brittany Young
Certified Celebrator

September 15, 2020

“Halloween might look a little different this year, but we can still have loads of fun while being safe.”

Melissa Johnson
Best Friends For Frosting

September 9, 2020

“Even if Halloween’s typical trick-or-treating is off the table for your family this year, it definitely doesn’t mean this holiday is canceled. It’s okay to still celebrate! And there are so many ways to make it fun, and safe, for the kids. What if you planned to celebrate throughout the whole month of October? It can be a whole season, not just a single day. Plan a few celebrations to spread it out and make the whole season memorable for the kids!”

“Even if Halloween’s typical trick-or-treating is off the table for your family this year, it definitely doesn’t mean this holiday is canceled. It’s okay to still celebrate! And there are so many ways to make it fun, and safe, for the kids. What if you planned to celebrate throughout the whole month of October? It can be a whole season, not just a single day. Plan a few celebrations to spread it out and make the whole season memorable for the kids!”

Melissa Johnson
Best Friends For Frosting

September 9, 2020

Jamie Lee Curtis, actress in ‘Halloween’
The New York Times

August 13, 2020

“What’s important is that children are resilient, and putting on a costume, whether or not you’re running around on the streets or in your own home, I think the idea of putting on the costume is the fun part. [Halloween will be different this year, but] different doesn’t have to be bad. Different can be different, and there can be a lot of fun and creativity.”

Candy Industry Professionals

Paul Chibe, CEO, Ferrero North America
CNBC
September 20, 2020

“Kids have had a tough, tough time with the coronavirus. They’re out of school. They’re away from their friends. They’re unable to participate in all the after-school activities. It would be a shame if adults, with all the creativity and ingenuity we have, we couldn’t figure out a way for kids to celebrate Halloween.”

Tim LeBel, President of Sales and “Chief Halloween Officer”, Mars Wrigley U.S.
Candy Industry
September 16, 2020

“We started to learn that Halloween [was] going to look different for people across the country, and we wanted to meet people where they are, providing a safe experience no matter how people choose to celebrate.”

“We started to learn that Halloween [was] going to look different for people across the country, and we wanted to meet people where they are, providing a safe experience no matter how people choose to celebrate.”

Tim LeBel, President of Sales and “Chief Halloween Officer”, Mars Wrigley U.S.
Candy Industry

September 16, 2020

Kirk Vashaw, Chairman and CEO, Spangler Candy Company
Candy & Snack TODAY
September 15, 2020

“COVID has stolen childhood from kids this year. From no school, to no parades, to no big family events, to no sporting events, to no big birthday parties, it has been a bummer. Americans will try to make up for some of this loss at Halloween.”

Ellen Gordon, Chairwoman, President and CEO, Tootsie Roll Industries Inc.
Candy & Snack TODAY
September 14, 2020

“I think people will be cautious, but they will go out and have fun. There is a lot of excitement, so I’m optimistic.”

“I think people will be cautious, but they will go out and have fun. There is a lot of excitement, so I’m optimistic.”

Ellen Gordon, Chairwoman, President and CEO, Tootsie Roll Industries Inc.
Candy & Snack TODAY

September 14, 2020

Chuck Raup, U.S. President, The Hershey Company
Marketwatch

September 14, 2020

“With kids having been stuck at home and school openings looking highly uncertain in most of the country, there’s likely to be more, and earlier, home-based Halloween activities than normal as a way for parents to occupy and engage their children. So, the holiday is on, and only one question remains: What are you going to be for Halloween?”

John Downs, President & CEO
National Confectioners Association
August 7, 2020

“Allow me assure you: Halloween is NOT canceled. Dressing up in costumes is not canceled. Enjoying a favorite treat is not canceled. Fall fun is not canceled. In 2020, every community is going to celebrate differently. Even if trick-or-treating is off the table for some, there are still plenty of fun and unique approaches to enjoying the Halloween season in a way that works for all families and keeps them safe. I know that right now many people are asking themselves, “Will Halloween be canceled?” To the contrary, I answer: Halloween is happening – and our creative celebrations are just getting started.”

“Allow me assure you: Halloween is NOT canceled. Dressing up in costumes is not canceled. Enjoying a favorite treat is not canceled. Fall fun is not canceled. In 2020, every community is going to celebrate differently. Even if trick-or-treating is off the table for some, there are still plenty of fun and unique approaches to enjoying the Halloween season in a way that works for all families and keeps them safe. I know that right now many people are asking themselves, “Will Halloween be canceled?” To the contrary, I answer: Halloween is happening – and our creative celebrations are just getting started.”

John Downs, President & CEO
National Confectioners Association

August 7, 2020

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