Brand new consumer research from the National Confectioners Association from September found that 80% of people believe that they will find creative and safe ways to celebrate the Halloween season this year. This is up from just 63% two months earlier in July. Joining this growing wave of approval and support are public health experts, community leaders, newspaper editorial boards and columnists who say that we can prioritize safety and still have a little fun this fall with Halloween celebrations that last all October long.

“I would not ban trick-or-treaters going door to door. I don’t think that’s appropriate. You have neighbors – if you want to go knock on your neighbor’s door, God bless you. I’m not going to tell you not to. If you want to go for a walk with your child through the neighborhood, I’m not going to tell you you can’t take your child through the neighborhood. I’m not going to do that. I’ll give you my advice and guidance and then you’ll make the decision about what you do that night.”

Andrew Cuomo, Governor of New York
The New York Post

September 15, 2020

Andrew Cuomo, Governor of New York
The New York Post

September 15, 2020

“I would not ban trick-or-treaters going door to door. I don’t think that’s appropriate. You have neighbors – if you want to go knock on your neighbor’s door, God bless you. I’m not going to tell you not to. If you want to go for a walk with your child through the neighborhood, I’m not going to tell you you can’t take your child through the neighborhood. I’m not going to do that. I’ll give you my advice and guidance and then you’ll make the decision about what you do that night.”

Andrew Cuomo, Governor of New York

Asa Hutchinson, Governor of Arkansas
THV 11 CBS
September 22, 2020

“If you follow our guidelines then it’ll ought to be a safe Halloween.”

Jeneen Interlandi, The New York Times Editorial Board Member
The New York Times

September 18, 2020

“When it comes to the holidays, most Americans will be in the same boat. Halloween may be just fine: Some health departments have advised against it, but trick-or-treating is a largely outdoor event, many costumes come with masks of their own, and fomite transmission (where the virus is contracted by touching inanimate objects like plastic pumpkins) is much less of a concern than scientists originally thought. With the right precautions (maybe skip the haunted house), it should be safe to ring those doorbells.”

“When it comes to the holidays, most Americans will be in the same boat. Halloween may be just fine: Some health departments have advised against it, but trick-or-treating is a largely outdoor event, many costumes come with masks of their own, and fomite transmission (where the virus is contracted by touching inanimate objects like plastic pumpkins) is much less of a concern than scientists originally thought. With the right precautions (maybe skip the haunted house), it should be safe to ring those doorbells.”

Jeneen Interlandi, The New York Times Editorial Board Member
The New York Times
September 18, 2020

Miranda Leon
The Associated Press
September 23, 2020

“So much has been taken from our kids this year — classes cut short, sports cancelled, summer camps cancelled,” she said. “I refuse to take away the joy of trick or treating from my kids.”

Vicki Ferretti
The New York Post

September 23, 2020

“It’s finally on a Saturday this year, and kids have suffered enough during the last few months. I think it’s smart if neighbors just leave out candy instead of opening the doors, but if not, my kids will have masks on and I don’t see how it’s any different than going and buying candy from a grocery store.”

“It’s finally on a Saturday this year, and kids have suffered enough during the last few months. I think it’s smart if neighbors just leave out candy instead of opening the doors, but if not, my kids will have masks on and I don’t see how it’s any different than going and buying candy from a grocery store.”

Vicki Ferretti
The New York Post

September 23, 2020

Bethany Mandel, Contributor
The Washington Examiner
September 10, 2020

“Our children have already had so much taken from them, and it is senseless from a scientific perspective to take trick-or-treating away from them, too.”

Melissa Johnson
Best Friends For Frosting

September 9, 2020

“Even if Halloween’s typical trick-or-treating is off the table for your family this year, it definitely doesn’t mean this holiday is canceled. It’s okay to still celebrate! And there are so many ways to make it fun, and safe, for the kids. What if you planned to celebrate throughout the whole month of October? It can be a whole season, not just a single day. Plan a few celebrations to spread it out and make the whole season memorable for the kids!”

“Even if Halloween’s typical trick-or-treating is off the table for your family this year, it definitely doesn’t mean this holiday is canceled. It’s okay to still celebrate! And there are so many ways to make it fun, and safe, for the kids. What if you planned to celebrate throughout the whole month of October? It can be a whole season, not just a single day. Plan a few celebrations to spread it out and make the whole season memorable for the kids!”

Melissa Johnson
Best Friends For Frosting

September 9, 2020

“If pizza can be delivered safely to your door, then kids can receive candy that you drop (or toss) into a sack on your porch or in the front yard… Halloween, we get the sense, is going to happen with or without the blessing of politicians. So how about one small nod to getting back to normalcy, starting with a pillowcase stuffed with chocolate, Mayor?”

“They might be able to do distanced events or go outdoors with two or three friends who stay apart,” she said, noting that the outdoor nature of trick-or-treating would make it safer than an indoor event. “It’s going to be tough, but there are creative ways to do it as long as you can stay within those parameters of distancing and masking hygiene.”

Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, a professor of pediatric infectious diseases and health research and policy at Stanford Health Care
TODAY

September 14, 2020

Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, a professor of pediatric infectious diseases and health research and policy at Stanford Health Care
TODAY
September 14, 2020

“They might be able to do distanced events or go outdoors with two or three friends who stay apart,” she said, noting that the outdoor nature of trick-or-treating would make it safer than an indoor event. “It’s going to be tough, but there are creative ways to do it as long as you can stay within those parameters of distancing and masking hygiene.”

Brittany Young
Certified Celebrator

September 15, 2020

“Halloween might look a little different this year, but we can still have loads of fun while being safe.”

Dr. Neha Vyas, family medicine specialist at The Cleveland Clinic
September 7, 2020

“Get creative and encourage your child to think about how their face mask can be part of their costume. Opt for a mask that matches the costume’s style, or have them pick a costume where a face mask is an essential part – like a doctor or a ninja. And as long as your child can still see and breathe fine and there’s plenty of ventilation, you can layer a Halloween mask over a cloth face mask.”

“Get creative and encourage your child to think about how their face mask can be part of their costume. Opt for a mask that matches the costume’s style, or have them pick a costume where a face mask is an essential part – like a doctor or a ninja. And as long as your child can still see and breathe fine and there’s plenty of ventilation, you can layer a Halloween mask over a cloth face mask.”

Dr. Neha Vyas, family medicine specialist at The Cleveland Clinic
September 7, 2020

Dr. Dana Hawkinson, medical director of infection prevention and control for the University of Kansas Health System
The Kansas City Star
September 7, 2020

“Since it happens outdoors — and if household members stick together, travel in as small a group as possible and distance themselves from others — it should be ‘very reasonable to do trick-or-treating’ this year.”

Dr. Gary Reschak, pediatrician at Northwestern Medicine Huntley Hospital
The Daily Meal

August 19, 2020

“If everyone stays outside, wears a mask and uses good hand hygiene, Halloween can be a safe and manageable celebration.”

“If everyone stays outside, wears a mask and uses good hand hygiene, Halloween can be a safe and manageable celebration.”

Dr. Gary Reschak, pediatrician at Northwestern Medicine Huntley Hospital
The Daily Meal
August 19, 2020

Dr. Amyna Husain,
Physician in pediatric emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins specializing in disaster preparedness for pediatrics
The Daily Meal
August 19, 2020

 “I can’t say that trick-or-treating is lost this year. I think there are ways to do it safely.”

Dr. Stephen Ostroff, former FDA deputy commissioner; chief scientist and former deputy director of the National Center for Infectious Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Five Considerations for State & City Health Departments Seeking to Create a Safe & Fun Halloween
September 10, 2020

“At a time when nothing seems to be normal because of COVID-19, parents desperately want something to be fun and relatively normal for their kids. Surveys have shown that most parents want their kids to celebrate Halloween. Therefore, the more appropriate question is not whether to celebrate Halloween, but how can we make it as safe as possible for everyone?” 

“At a time when nothing seems to be normal because of COVID-19, parents desperately want something to be fun and relatively normal for their kids. Surveys have shown that most parents want their kids to celebrate Halloween. Therefore, the more appropriate question is not whether to celebrate Halloween, but how can we make it as safe as possible for everyone?” 

Dr. Stephen Ostroff, former FDA deputy commissioner; chief scientist and former deputy director of the National Center for Infectious Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Five Considerations for State & City Health Departments Seeking to Create a Safe & Fun Halloween
September 10, 2020

Janice Hahn,
Los Angeles County supervisor
Twitter
September 9, 2020

“Even a pandemic can’t cancel Halloween— in fact, it’s the only day of the year we were expected to wear masks before this crisis started. Be safe, practice physical distancing, and get creative about how you celebrate with your kids this year.”

Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University
The Washington Post

September 9, 2020

“Will Halloween 2020 have to be canceled? The answer, happily, is no — if we adopt the right precautions and the right attitude.”

“Will Halloween 2020 have to be canceled? The answer, happily, is no — if we adopt the right precautions and the right attitude.”

Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University
The Washington Post
September 9, 2020

Ryan Alsop,
chief administrative officer, Kern County
ABC News Bakersfield
September 10, 2020

“Announcing that you’re canceling Halloween is a fairly bold statement to make; I don’t know how you do that.”

Amy Schwabe, columnist
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

September 10, 2020

“Coronavirus doesn’t have to cancel Halloween. People are brainstorming safe trick-or-treat alternatives.”

“Coronavirus doesn’t have to cancel Halloween. People are brainstorming safe trick-or-treat alternatives.”

Amy Schwabe, columnist
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
September 10, 2020

Stephan Wilder, mayor of North Canton
WKYC
September 10, 2020

“For such a traditional experience of Halloween, I have all the confidence that our community will watch out for each other and maintain that families and children can have a safe activity.”

Phil Murphy, governor of New Jersey
NJ Advance Media

September 9, 2020

“As far as this moment in time, Halloween’s still on in New Jersey. Obviously, it’s not gonna be a normal Halloween. We’re gonna have to do things very carefully.”

“As far as this moment in time, Halloween’s still on in New Jersey. Obviously, it’s not gonna be a normal Halloween. We’re gonna have to do things very carefully.”

Phil Murphy, governor of New Jersey
NJ Advance Media
September 9, 2020

Joseph Petty, mayor of Worcester
NBC Boston
September 10, 2020

“This is probably one of the biggest events besides Christmas in the country for both children and adults, and people love Halloween, they love having a good time, and I just don’t want to take that away from them.”

Jeanette Marantos, staff writer
Los Angeles Times

September 11, 2020

“But really, this is Halloween we’re talking about, near the top of every child’s can’t-wait list. Can we really just lock our doors, turn off the lights and say, “Better luck next year?” No, darn it, this is America, land of the free and home of “There’s got to be a way,” so, of course, people are already working on this problem.”

“But really, this is Halloween we’re talking about, near the top of every child’s can’t-wait list. Can we really just lock our doors, turn off the lights and say, “Better luck next year?” No, darn it, this is America, land of the free and home of “There’s got to be a way,” so, of course, people are already working on this problem.”

Jeanette Marantos, staff writer
Los Angeles Times
September 11, 2020

David Sweat, Shelby County Health Department chief of epidemiology
FOX 13 Memphis
September 10, 2020

“There are no plans at the moment to ‘cancel’ Halloween.”

Dr. Edith Bracho-Sanchez, assistant professor of pediatrics and director of the pediatric telemedicine program with Columbia University Medical Center
Good Morning America

September 11, 2020

“I don’t want to say that trick-or-treating should be completely canceled. It’s something that communities are going to have to weigh community by community, and that families are going to have to weigh family by family.”

“I don’t want to say that trick-or-treating should be completely canceled. It’s something that communities are going to have to weigh community by community, and that families are going to have to weigh family by family.”

Dr. Edith Bracho-Sanchez, assistant professor of pediatrics and director of the pediatric telemedicine program with Columbia University Medical Center
Good Morning America
September 11, 2020

The City of Hillard
September 3, 2020

“Almost 90 percent of respondents said they think trick-or-treating can safely happen – especially with some basic precautions.”

Dr. Mark Loafman, chair of family and community medicine at Cook County Health
NBC Chicago

September 3, 2020

“So that’s sort of a backdrop so I think from a public health point of view where we always want to help families address opportunities to find other ways to celebrate it and, you know, the risks associated with that.”

“So that’s sort of a backdrop so I think from a public health point of view where we always want to help families address opportunities to find other ways to celebrate it and, you know, the risks associated with that.”

Dr. Mark Loafman, chair of family and community medicine at Cook County Health
NBC Chicago
September 3, 2020

Jamie Lee Curtis, actress in ‘Halloween’
The New York Times
August 13, 2020

“What’s important is that children are resilient, and putting on a costume, whether or not you’re running around on the streets or in your own home, I think the idea of putting on the costume is the fun part. [Halloween will be different this year, but] different doesn’t have to be bad. Different can be different, and there can be a lot of fun and creativity.”

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